Handheld Designer Blog

Post by Category: Tutorials

Creating Native Apps - Getting Started With PhoneGap and Handheld Designer

April 1, 2013

Mobile web-apps are great, and can have many advantages over native apps. But sometimes you need to accomplish something that can only be done by a native app. Perhaps you need to access the device hardware, like the camera or GPS hardware, in a way that web-apps are prohibited to do, or maybe you just want to sell your app on the App Store.

Fortunately, an open-source tool called PhoneGap makes it easy to “wrap” a standard HTML5 mobile web-app in a native wrapper, producing a native app suitable for submission to the App Store. In this tutorial, we’ll review the steps necessary to convert a web-app created with Handheld Designer into a native iPhone or iPad application.

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Tutorial: The Obligatory Weather App, Part 3

April 1, 2013

In the second part of this tutorial, we created a “detail” page that displays the detail from an individual day’s forecast. In the tutorial’s final installment, we’ll create a “settings” page that allows the user to personalize the forecast location.

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Tutorial: The Obligatory Weather App, Part 2

April 1, 2013

In part one of this tutorial, we created the main page of our weather app, and added code to query a weather web-service, process the returned forecast, and display it in a list view. In part two, we’ll create a “detail” page that displays the detail from an individual day’s forecast.

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Tutorial: The Obligatory Weather App, Part 1

April 1, 2013

Weather apps have become a kind of “Hello, world.” of mobile computing. Their simple form, limited functionality, and universal understanding provide an opportunity for programmers and designers to explore different aspects of a platform’s capabilities.

In this tutorial, we’ll build a simple weather app that will use AJAX to query a weather web-service to retrieve a 4-day forecast, dynamically display the forecast in a list view, and provide a detail view for each day. The user will also be able to configure the which city’s forecast is displayed, and whether temperatures are displayed in Fahrenheit or Celsius.

You can follow along with the tutorial, or download a fully-functional version of the weather app from the sample gallery within Handheld Designer.

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Tutorial: Accessing Data From A Remote SQL Database, Part 2

September 2, 2012

In part 1 of this tutorial, we covered the creation of a simple set of PHP scripts that give our Address Book application access to a remote MySQL database. Now that the scripts have been created, we can move on to building the app in Handheld Designer.

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Tutorial: Accessing Data From A Remote SQL Database, Part 1

September 2, 2012

While Handheld Designer supports built-in database functionality with the server-side HDDatabase object, you sometimes find yourself needing to access data in an existing SQL database. This tutorial explores one possible strategy for accomplishing this.

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Tutorial: JQMListView Object

April 17, 2012

The JQMListView object is a easy way to create native-style lists of items containing text, images, badges and more. In this tutorial, we’ll explore this object and experiment with the different ways it can be used to enhance your apps. You can follow along step-by-step, or view the completed app (with source code) by selecting it from the Sample Gallery within Handheld Designer.

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Tutorial: Currency Converter

February 5, 2012

Whether you’ve got ninety thousand Pounds in your pajamas or forty thousand French Francs in your fridge, currency converters can come in handy. In this tutorial, we’ll build a simple currency converter using a few of the new jQuery Mobile user interface controls and exchange rate data retrieved from a third-party web service.

You can follow along step-by-step, or view the completed app (with source code) by selecting it from the Sample Gallery within Handheld Designer.

Read the tutorial... ➙

Tutorial: My First Web Application

November 21, 2011

In this post we’ll build a very simple math flashcard app. We’ll present the player with two random numbers and prompt them to supply their sum. We’ll check whether the answer is correct, and display the results to the player.

The app will be built using HDLabel, HDTextbox and HDButton objects, tied together with a little JavaScript.

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